Adjusting Instrumentation w/ Sir McCoy's Setup

Ableton

jupebox

about 9 years ago (edited)

As you probably know, Matt McCoy (hereafter referred to as Sir McCoy) uses a sweet approach to live sets -- loading all of the songs into one song file. I think that is brilliant, and I have contemplated using that same idea. However, if I were to do that, it would be pretty tough to adjust instrumentation -- such as muting a particular part or adjusting the EQ of an instrument. Right? If only loading 1 audio channel, that's not a problem. But I would need to load lots of audio channels. Is the only way limiting the audio channels to a few? (Like using the same instrumentation -- e.g., a 5 part band -- for all loops in the song file?) Maybe I'm missing something... Thanks, guys!!
wadehuggins

about 9 years ago (edited)

Are you talking about editing loops beforehand or during a set? I use Sir McCoy's set up in the same way that I have all the songs in one file but I edit the individual loop files in a master file and bounce the .wav file to pull into my "Sir McCoy" set file. That way I keep the loops I want, how i want them in that file in the form of .wav. For example, this week we are doing Holy by Matt Redman. I don't need the electric guitar parts, or the piano parts from the loop file from loopcommunity. But I just opened the file and created my own loop using all of the instrumentation that i wanted along with the cues and boom, it's done. Drop it into my McCoy master loops file and hit play. Perhaps I misunderstood your question though. Are you wanting to give your sound guy 5 different channels for all the loops in a file? It seems easier to me to make one file that is mixed to your specs and send that one file back to the soundboard.
scoottie

about 9 years ago (edited)

I would load every thing you've got into one set. Group them into logical tracks. (Bass, Drums, Loops, Guitar, Synths, Lead Lines, etc) However your mind groups the individual parts. So, now you should have maybe 10 tracks at most with clips going down the scenes. So if you want to mute a particular clip... Say you don't want the second guitar part for one song because someone is covering it. Just secondary click it and deactivate clip. You can pick exactly which clips you want for each song without removing them from the set and without having to create crazy amounts of tracks.
jeffcaylor

about 9 years ago (edited)

Yeah, these guys know their stuff for sure. Definitely click KP's link above. One critical thing (and part of your question) that is worth addressing additionally is what you said, "Do I need to limit the audio channels to a few?" I've spent quite a bit of time on this too and I would say "Yes. Sort of." Here's how my tracks look in my "Sir McCoy Super File." In fact, I use the same template for production as well, so when I bring the master files over, I don't have to bounce them down. http://cl.ly/3d281s0W1j2o3G1w330S I've opened the CUE group track so you can see the possible clips I'd have in there. Planning your master file is important and unique to each person and will probably evolve as you lead with it and see what works for your style. I have 24 tracks in the file but using groups makes it pretty manageable.
mattmccoy

almost 9 years ago (edited)

Hey Everyone! 

Great conversation happening here. These are all excellent ideas. Grouping tracks is definitely the way to go to minimize the amount of tracks in your screen view. The image that @jeffcaylor posted above is an excellent example of this. And like Dugan said, just simply right click and deactivate any clips that you don't want to use at the time. I also adjust my individual clip volumes (in the Clip Overview window) and try to stay away from adjusting the track faders. I try to leave them at unity. 

Jeff - your idea of adding a track for the original DEMO is brilliant. That could be very useful in rehearsals when you need to quickly play the band a sample of what you're practicing. 

Glad you all are a part of Loop Community! Great things are coming.

-MM

 

jeffcaylor

almost 9 years ago (edited)

Thanks Matt! Another great reason to keep a demo track is that you can easily put the demo in the same key as what the band is playing. I can't sing as high as Chris Tomlin on most of his recordings (at least not for 3 services on a Sunday!) so I just pitch him down to my key for practice. PRO TIP: use complex pro warp mode when warping / pitching full-mix tracks with vocals like this.