Logic & MainStage

Mastering in logic

Logic & MainStage

gtracey24

about 8 years ago (edited)

I've been working with my own tracks for a while now and I ABSOLUTELY love it. The only thing is that my mastering skills aren't the best. It's really apparent that I don't know how to master when one track is super loud and the next one is hard to hear. Any suggestions on how to master in Logic? I know it's a broad question, but even some kind of book that was helpful to someone woud be great.
AndyWalker

about 8 years ago (edited)

Mastering live backtracks is hard because you aren't working with every element in the final mix. You have to be mindful of the live dynamics of the song and adjust the dynamics of the loop arrangement accordingly. What I have found works best is just using a brickwall limiter on my main loop bus, not hitting too hard, just enough to bring up the volume, and smooth out any peaks. The stock Logic one is the 'Adaptive Limiter' and it works great. I also don't like my tracks hitting 0.0 every time because I want to leave a bit of headroom so the track isn't blasting the board. I usually try to peak at around -4 or so. The easiest way to get consistency is just choose a track as a reference and reference that every time! Hope this helps and happy creating!
gtracey24

about 8 years ago (edited)

Ok definitely. What about mastering at an equal volume for a particular instrument/beat? I sometimes run into the problem of recording something and it's at a good volume for most of the tune but it will blast when things are built up. Is it just a matter of recording at a better volume? Or is there away to equalize things so it is more controlled?
scoottie

about 8 years ago (edited)

I would say when mastering backing tracks they should be as dynamic as the live instrumentation they are being played with. So, there is usually some compression on vocals, guitars, drums etc. but never a limiter on the master fader. Live sound is very dynamic, and your tracks should be as well. Compression is very misunderstood. In short, it's volume automation. It can help keep an instrument or vocal consistant. Depending on your tracked instrumentation a compressor would be used to smooth out. If you've tracked a piano or tambo, a compressor can help if certain notes are jumping out. Of course compression can also be used to color, saturate or slam tracks as well. That more on the creative side of using effects. Now if certain sections of the song's tracks are too loud/too soft don't use compression. Use volume automation. If you were to mix anything... weather than be live sound or a recorded project... the two most influential and important tools are EQ and volume. Third would be panning. The more proficient you become with EQ the less you will be forced to use all the other tools. (EQ includes mic placement and instrumentation)
gtracey24

about 8 years ago (edited)

Wise words. Are there any good books/ out there for this kind of stuff? Not necessarily on Logic, just in general.
scoottie

about 8 years ago (edited)

Check out Pensados Place. http://www.pensadosplace.tv/
gtracey24

about 8 years ago (edited)

wow...that place has a lot of info. Thanks fellas